Google Censors Magazine for Daring to Publish Anti-Islamic Terror Content

Political News

Front Page Magazine says tech giant Google was censoring the outlet for reporting on Islamic terrorism.

Daniel Greenfield, journalism fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center, revealed in the organization’s flagship publication how Google AdSense was unusually explanatory when rejecting the Center’s application for the ad program. The Big Tech company reportedly cited a Front Page article discussing a terrorist attack and the radical Islamic beliefs of the perpetrators as objectionable. Google’s rejection of the application, wrote Greenfield, “told us what we could do to make our way into the good graces of the company that dominates online search and advertising, controlling what much of the country and the world sees.” 

Specifically, Greenfield continued, “[a]ll we had to do was stop talking about Islamic terrorism.” 

Google first accused Front Page, and especially Horowitz, of generally writing and hosting “dangerous or derogatory content.” Google referenced the 2021 piece, “Remember The San Bernardino Fourteen” by author Lloyd Billingsley. The piece provided details about a devastating and deadly 2015 terror attack in California, but also argued that the terrorists’ radical Islamic beliefs were a key factor.

You Might Like

The article also criticized Kamala Harris, then California attorney general, for claiming the attack was not to be blamed on Islam, joined by terrorist-linked organization CAIR.

Greenfield rebuked Google for effectively defending radical Islamists: “Google would rather that you not remember the 14 victims or the Islamic terrorists who killed them.” Instead, wrote Greenfield, Google “has told us that we ‘must fix’ this and numberless other articles that it objects to. But what would it like us to ‘fix’ here? What else except the truth about Islamic terrorism[?]”

“Billingsley’s article laid out the complicity of other family members of the Muslim terrorists in the attack, and the silence of Biden and Kamala about Islamic terrorism, and closed by urging, ‘remember the 14 innocents murdered by Islamic terrorists Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik on December 2, 2015, in San Bernardino, California, USA.,’” Greenfield wrote. Apparently, such framing was verboten for Google. 

Google not only accused the San Bernardino Fourteen piece of being “derogatory” and “dangerous” but also containing “unreliable and harmful claims.” But Greenfield pointed out Google and other tech companies have a sordid history of foolish censorship, such as when Martin Luther King Jr.’s  “Letter From Birmingham Jail” was allegedly and ludicrously suppressed for containing the “n word.” 

Running cover for radical Islamists and others considered protected groups by leftists appears to be par for the course for Google. MRC Free Speech America caught Google covering for jihadis as well, including its Gemini AI originally downplaying evidence of Hamas-inflicted rape. In a previous Supreme Court case, Gonzalez v. Google, Google argued that it could not be held liable for its YouTube algorithms promoting content from jihadis because of Section 230 immunity, yet Google appears to be actively covering for jihadis.

Conservatives are under attack. Contact Google at 650-253-0000 and demand it be held to account to mirror the First Amendment while providing transparency, clarity on so-called hate speech and equal footing for conservatives. If you have been censored, contact us using CensorTrack’s contact form, and help us hold Big Tech accountable.

Articles You May Like

Macy’s settles proxy fight with activist Arkhouse, adds two of the firm’s nominees as directors
OJ Simpson dies surrounded by his children and grandchildren
REPORT: Biden and Harris Think LGBT Voter Support is Going to Save Them in November
House Panel Vows Massive Boost To Enlisted Military Pay Amid Recruiting Crisis
Nike CEO says focus on its own website and stores went too far as it embraces wholesale retailers again

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *