A Letter from 65-Year-Old Reed Christensen the DC Gulag on the Anniversary of January 6th

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In September 2023, Army Veteran Reed K. Christensen was found guilty on eight charges, including four felonies and four misdemeanor offenses, after attending the January 6 rally.

The 65-year-old Christensen, who was pepper sprayed by Capitol Police, was found guilty of assault for bumping into a police officer while blinded.

In April of 2021, his home was raided by over a dozen FBI agents for the crimes of walking on the grass and trying to get past the guards to wave the flag on the steps of the U.S. Capitol.

Reed wrote to The Gateway Pundit on the third anniversary of January 6th.

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Washington D.C. City of Gold
Letters from the DC gulag
By Reed K. Christensen
Today it is exactly three years since the historic January 6th, 2021 “Stop the Steal” rally. In less than a week from today, I will be chained for transport from the DC gulag to a Washington D.C. District court to be sentenced for my actions on that day. Four months ago, a D.C. jury found me guilty on all charges put against me by the DOJ – including three felony assaults that each come with a maximum of eight years incarceration.
After being locked up in the J6 cell block, the questions the other prisoners asked of me about my case were: how many assaults are you facing? Are level A or level B (with a deadly weapon)? For the first couple of months, I would say, “level A, three assaults.” But over time, this began to strike me as strange. This is because I never saw any protester in my area south of the west steps assault an officer, and I never saw an officer assault a protester. I stated as much in the book I wrote about my experiences around Jan 6 and stated so in numerous interviews before being sent to jail.
This dichotomy struck me as a very interesting phenomenon. Somehow the judicial wizards of Washington had transformed an old guy with bad knees attempting to cross a police line, and failing to do so after being shoved back, into a report to the judge for sentencing that uses the word assault six times in describing my actions. What’s even more astounding is they got me, the guy who was there and who knows what he did and what he intended to do, to use the word assault to describe what an impartial observer would call bumping.
How did they do that?
At some point during my sentencing, the judge will probably ask if I learned anything from being locked up. He may be surprised when I reply that I have learned about alchemy. Readers will remember alchemy as the effort undertaken in the Middle Ages to use magic (I.e. chemical reactions) in the effort to change base metals such as lead into gold. Today we understand that changing electron orbits through various chemical compounds could never change the nucleus of the metal. But where the old wizards failed with metal, the new wizards of Washington have succeeded with the law.
The alchemy of the law starts by making sure the correct incantations or statutes are used. No longer do laws go through the old process of elected legislators holding hearings, debating, and compromising. The work of creating well-thought-out laws that follow the spirit of the constitution and which fit with the citizenry with all its diversity will not yield the correct alchemy recipe. Today our statutes arrive in Congress already written in prepackaged parcels of 6,000 pages and are kept safely locked in the basement of the capitol. The statute is revealed only hours before it votes to avoid all that fractions and messy debate and comprise which can ruin an alchemy spell. Each legislator then represents their constituency by voting as directed by their party leaders.
With legislators out of the way and turned into rubber stamps, who is going to craft the needed legal incantations? Not to worry. It turns out that Washington D.C. is chock full of thousands and thousands of people highly trained in writing statutes that are amenable to alchemy – the lawyers of the K Street lobbyist and government agencies such as the DOJ.
I will detail the alchemy process of the DOJ since I am familiar with it, having just spent all my retirement funds from a lifetime of work on two and a half years of legal fees facing them in court. This spell starts with carefully worded statutes such as 18 US Code 111. Its title reads as follows, “Assaulting, Resisting, or Impeding certain officers.” This is a serious statute about a serious felony. It comes with eight years imprisonment and a $250,000 fine. (As a point of comparison, a murder conviction in the U.S. averages eight years of incarceration.) But what do the words resist and impede mean in a statute about felony assault?
It turns out they mean whatever a DOJ lawyer tells a D.C. jury – which is to say, whatever that lawyer wants it to mean. This is the magic of Washington D.C.’s legal alchemy; turning Impede (lead) into Assault (gold).
Let me walk you through this magical process using my case. My sentencing report to the judge reads, “The defendant began to assault Officer Robert English.” On the witness stand Officer English did not remember interacting with me. So the DOJ prosecuted played a body-cam video that showed me bumping into his back after I was shoved back toward the line after attempting to cross. In the video, Officer English does not change his stance or move his arms to deal with my “assault.” He looks behind for a few seconds and sees an old man blinded by mace stumbling around, then he looks forward again. That’s it.
The DOJ lawyer presses on, asking, “Officer English, wasn’t the execution of your duty to hold the police line impeded by the defendant’s action?” In other words, did my bump momentarily distract him? Under this definition, Officer English says, “Yes, I was impeded.” A sworn officer of the law just told a D.C. jury that he was impeded. (Impede – that is lead.)
Now the power of Washington D.C. alchemy kicks in. The D.C. jury convicts me of impeding Officer English since he was distracted. But the statute 18 US code 111 says, “Assault, Resist, or Impede” with no distinction among them. Therefore, I am now convicted under a felony assault statute and face a possible eight-year sentence. (Assault – that is gold.) As a bonus, in all its reports and communication about my case, the DOJ can now refer to me as a felon convicted of assault.
As I have thought about this in the D.C. gulag, I have wondered if the average American knows you can get an eight-year felony conviction for distracting a D.C. cop from doing his job. In other words, going up to an officer on a police line and distracting him by asking for directions to the nearest bathroom can be turned into a life-destroying felony equivalent to murder. Who says America is soft on crime?
In a short while, I will know the results of my sentencing hearing. What the judge will want to know is not about alchemy, but about my attitude on the “not political” issues of Joe Biden’s legitimacy and 2020 election corruption. Frankly, I have not changed my mind on these topics after being locked up after my “not political” trial. (This obstinance is a common trait of the “not political” prisoners here in the D.C. gulag.) Three years of collective experience of the D.C. Gulag prisoners says that showing any defiance on these issues after being convicted will add years to my sentence.
Oh well. I am who I am. I am 65 years old and I am not going to change my politics. The legal wizards of Washington have coated me with enough gold so the judge can throw me in the slammer for years, but inside my nucleus has not changed. As a response to a stolen election, I would still try to break that police line to wave the American flag on the steps of the Capitol.
Reed K. Christensen is currently a prisoner in the Washington D.C. gulag. He ran in the 2022 Oregon Governor Republican primary but had to bow out due to a stroke. Some of his campaign presentations can be found at savethekid.com. He wrote a book of the same name which contains ideas on how to save Constitutional America.
In memoriam:
The author invites every American to pause today to reflect on the hundreds of people whose lives have been crushed by a rogue FBI, weaponized DOJ, and corrupt D.C. courts.
Please especially remember the J6 attendees who died at the hands of Capitol police; Ashli Babbitt, and Rosanne Boyleland, and those who died due to the heavy-handed police response; Benjamin Phillips, and Kevin Greason.

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