CBS Exploits ‘Transgender’ 11 Year Old to Attack Virginia Bathroom Law

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On Tuesday’s edition of CBS Evening News, the network found a way to criticize conservatives for their opposition to the left’s obsession with appeasing people who claim to be “transgender” and blame them for creating an environment that led to the shooting at the gay night club in Colorado Springs, Colorado. This time, anchor Norah O’Donnell and D.C. correspondent Natalie Brand exploited an 11-year-old “transgender” girl to attack Virginia Republican Governor Glenn Youngkin’s proposal to require students to use the bathrooms that correspond to their sex, not the sex they pretend to be.

“The mass shooting in Colorado Springs reignited fears in the LGBTQ+ community over inadequate protections,” O’Donnell whined. “It’s a concern playing out in Virginia where next week the state is set to reverse its limited rights for transgender students,” she added. 

Brand then took over to give her report which featured a girl named Betty Thomas who claims to be “nonbinary.” “When Betty Thomas was seven years old, this children’s book sparked a conversation about gender,” Brand claimed. 

“Betty, now a vibrant eleven-year-old identifies as nonbinary and uses the pronouns Ze/Zir,” Brand reported as if this was completely normal. She never explained how it’s possible that a seven-year-old can ever be mature enough to decide to change their gender, nor did she explain what “Ze/Zir” means. 

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After attempting to make their viewers sympathize with Thomas, Brand turned to attack Youngkin over his plan to enact common sense and science-based bathroom laws in schools.

“Current Governor Republican Glenn Youngkin’s administration has proposed its own policy that has protections against discrimination and bullying but would require parental permission to change names or pronouns at school and would require students use bathrooms that correspond to their sex assigned at birth,” Brand bemoaned before huffing that “the move has led to a heated public debate.” 

Brand ended by worrying that due to Youngkin’s policies, transgender students like Betty will “wonder whether they’ll still have support at school.” 

This segment on CBS was made possible by Liberty Mutual. Their information is linked so you can contact them. 

To read the transcript of this segment click “expand”: 

CBS Evening News
11/22/2022
6:44:36 p.m. Eastern

NORAH O’DONNELL: The mass shooting in Colorado Springs reignited fears in the LGBTQ+ Community over inadequate protections. It’s a concern playing out in Virginia where next week the state is set to reverse its limited rights for transgender students. CBS’s Natalie Brand goes in-depth on the policy controversy. 

BETTY THOMAS: Then one amazing day, everything changed. 

NATALIE BRAND: When Betty Thomas was seven years old, this children’s book sparked a conversation about gender. 

THOMAS: There was finally a breakthrough in those like three years of just complete anger and sorrow and confusion. 

BRAND: Betty, now a vibrant eleven-year-old identifies as nonbinary and uses the pronouns Ze/Zir. 

COURTNEY THOMAS: As soon as Betty had words to describe what Ze was feeling, Ze was able to start moving toward a more authentic life. 

BRAND: Mom Courtney Thomas says accommodating school policies put forward by Virginia’s Democratic governor in 2021 allowed Betty to open up in the classroom. 

COURTNEY THOMAS: Now our teachers, our principals, our counselors get the training and the information that they need in order to accommodate kids like Betty, but it’s also led to a very serious backlash. 

BRAND: Current Governor Republican Glenn Youngkin’s administration has proposed its own policy that has protections against discrimination and bullying but would require parental permission to change names or pronouns at school and would require students use bathrooms that correspond to their sex assigned at birth. The move has led to a heated public debate. 

TRANS ACTIVIST: If you enact these policies, children will die. 

VIRGINIA PARENT: My parental rights don’t stop where your feelings begin. 

BRAND: Mom Sarah Vias supports the change. 

SARAH VIAS: You cannot have good quality of education or of mental health excluding the parent from the process. 

BRAND: The Thomas family is most worried about the students who don’t have support at home. 

THOMAS: That decision that I made changed my life so much. 

BRAND: As students like Betty wonder whether they’ll still have support at school.

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